gill moore photography

Archive for the 'art' Category

Streetview: A new exhibition for city lovers and fans of Greater Manchester’s architecture.

Streetview exhibition Jan 25th 2013 - Feb 18th 2013

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A new exhibition of original art for city lovers, map makers and fans of Greater Manchester’s architecture. A series of illustrations and models based on Google’s Streetview, with over 30 works including pieces by New-Yorker contributor Stanley Chow, Mark O’Brien, and Clare Allan, as well as international pieces including Luke McGarry – the youngest ever recipient of the National Cartoonists Society’s Silver T-Square prize.

Preview night is this Friday 25th Jan 2013 from 6pm in the Northern Quarter gallery nq2022 on Dale Street,  M1 1EZ.  Everyone is invited.  There is a Facebook event page for Streetview, where you can see who else is coming.

Somehow, amongst all these really talented artists and their work, you will find on display a Gill Moore original has sneaked in!  It’s my first ever attempt at creating an illustration (New Years Resolutions have much to answer for).  Below is a small slice from my effort.  The view in Manchester I picked to draw was one of my favourites; Castlefield Basin and it is copied from the image displayed of the area on Google Streetview.

Original Illustration by Gill Moore of Castlefield Basin based on a Google Streetview image.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The back room will feature a spin off exhibition bringing together the works of Secret Cities photographer Andrew Brooks and illustrator Michael Morrell.  Both artists have documented the BBC Oxford Road demolition, Brooks through his unique style of photography and Morrell through a series of illustrations that will come together to form a comic/social history newspaper.

Have a browse, then join us into the night as the dancing gets started with DOTS AND LOOPS!

This isn’t going to be an ordinary launch, it’s going to be the first big party of 2013, and it’s Burns night so come down, it is sponsored by Tunnocks so there will be free biscuits, well there will be if they make it down from Scotland through the snow!

250 FREE copies of the lovely event brochure care of Ubiquitous and designed by Sam Swaffield will be available on the night

The exhibition will run until February 18th, but there aint no party like the launch night party…

Streetview is curated by Hayley Flynn.  Hayley runs a superb award-winning blog Skyliner, which aims to discover unusual art and architecture. It is well worth a read:  http://theskyliner.org

 


Liverpool Tate, Biennial 2010. View from the Tate through the window across the Mersey.

tate_window_Mersey

Had a lovely cultural day out in Liverpool yesterday. Stopped off at the Bluecoat (great lunch upstairs at the Bistro) and the Walker Art Gallery for the John Moores Painting Prize 2010.

Fave images from the John Moores:

johnmoores_mountainpeaks johnmoores_refractions

johnmoores_zoutao1 johnmoores_lizhouwei

Ran out of time, didn’t manage to see any of the Wolfgang Tillman’s at the Walker or A Foundation “New Contemporaries” so another trip over is the only answer.  So much brilliant stuff over in Liverpool at the minute.

Also trivia note, spotted Stuart Maconie (@stuartmaconie on Twitter), recording a segment about the John Moores Prize for the Beeb’s “Inside Out”.  Would imagine that will be on this week or next.

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Papergirl Manchester: like art? like cycling? then this is for you …

papergirl

I am hoping to take part in this fantastic art project which started in Berlin and now comes to Manchester in September.  I need to find time to print up some of my latest photography work (one print I’m submitting has just been shortlisted for an award but I’m not allowed to announce what just yet).  I am determined to find time to support such a terrific idea.

To get involved you can donate an hour or two and become an art distributer via bicycle or you can create and donate your artistic work.  Or both.  This art can be anything; any subject (within decency realms), any quantity, originals, prints, photos, copies etc. all are welcome.  Details of how to submit are here. Work should be between A4 and A1 in size.  The Deadline is 1st September 2010.

Each distributed art roll will contain several different works, so each one holds a unique combination of works.

The bike bit is designed to mean the art will go to anyone who happens to be in the vicinity of the cycle route at the time, so it’s completely random and without stereotype.  It fits with the quirky nature of the project and allows art to become public art.

All work will be exhibited at Nexus Cafe, Manchester Soup Kitchen, Norther Quarter, Manchester, prior to distribution and some contributors work is being featured over on the Papergirl tumblr site right this minute ….  so get along and have a shufty.

The project is on twitter and facebook and has been featured over at central station creative network and on the Creative Boom website.  You can read more about the original Berlin project here (don’t worry if your German is a little rusty there is an English translation).

Finally, if Ms Papergirl MCR (Janice?) reads this, I have two questions:

1) Can I buy a Papergirl MCR tee-shirt?  I see Berlin had one and it’s lovely.
2) Can cycling boys take part and be Paperboys?

UPDATESept 8th 2010. Preview Night, all welcome at Soup Kitchen: See the Papergirl Manchester submissions before they are distributed at our exhibition launch night, on Thursday 30th September from 7pm. Papergirl Manchester will showcase artists from Russia, Estonia, Canada, France, Ukraine, Italy, Spain, U.S.A, Sweden, Italy, Germany and the UK. So far we have received almost 700 pieces of work to be distributed. The exhibition will feature at least one piece by each artist.

UPDATE: Sept 8th 2010.  Papergirl still accepting late submissions: “We have a few late submissions coming in so if you haven’t submitted anything but want to, get in touch http://bit.ly/dcg2ik

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Graffiti in Manchester “Big Ideas Need Big Spaces”

Despite being informed that this was part of a Diesel ad campagn from 2008 (thank you @pgreenhalgh on Twitter) I still quite like this shot and thought I’d post it up. Fresh off the chip so to speak; taken this afternoon from a little sidestreet just off Ancoats, Northern Quarter, Manchester, sunny England.

Plus (a first for me), numero uno iPhoto upload onto my blog. So, albeit a tad grainy, but it’s a better camera to have with you whilst cycling back from a Client meeting than none at all!

bigideasneedbigspaces

LINKS: After a bit of digging I found a couple of other Manchester graffiti images featuring the same slogan:

Flickr/Kate Aldridge
Flickr/Claire Wroe
Flickr/davescunningplan
Flickr/Polyhymnia_

[tweet]

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Stephen King: Lewis’s Fifth Floor: A Department Story

stephenking_lewiss

Really enjoyed these images from Liverpool photographer Stephen King, featuring photographs taken in Lewis’s Department Store in Liverpool, one of the UK’s oldest and most iconic department stores a building sadly shut down and hidden since the early 1980s.

What a cracking idea, I wish I’d thought of it!  The still life images work better for me, some terrific compositions.  The project has it’s own website www.lewissfifthfloor.com (though it’s a bit slow to load) and there are quite a few images over on Stephen’s site.

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I remember, as a Wirral girl born and bred, it was a big treat to be taken over to Lewis’s on a Saturday for a shopping expedition.  I particularly remember the broken biscuit department was a highlight.

Dates: 26th February to 30th August 2010, Lewis’s Fifth Floor: A Department Story at Liverpool’s  National Conservation Centre.

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“Arty Wow Moment”: Review of Angels of Anarchy @ Manchester City Art Gallery

 

UPDATE ADDED:  5 March 2012.  Tremendous blog post on Francesca Woodman and her work over at Wayne Ford’s Posterous.   Her tragically short life is put under the microscope and the resulting post is a wonderfully informed and a comprehensive look at her background, work and influences.  Thank you Mr Ford!

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It has to be said I probably attend my fair share of exhibitions, but what doesn’t happen very often is that I enjoy one so much I feel a powerful urge to blog about it.  But the “Angels of Anarchy” exhibition currently in residence at Manchester City Art Gallery really does deserve to be seen by anyone with even the vaguest interest in the visual arts.

angelsposter

My last real big “arty wow moment” in Manchester was back in 1997 at the David Hockney exhibition, the one with all his photocollage stuff.  OK, well yes, I did also have one seeing the footage of Gandhi visiting Darwen at the Procession exhibition (Cornerhouse, Summer09).  But that doesn’t really count as it wasn’t the art that made me hold my breath with wonder, rather the actual event happening at all and being recorded forever by someone with a movie camera.

pearblossom_hockney

To be truthful, the only reason ‘Angels of Anarchy’ even twitched on my radar was due to the inclusion of some of Lee Miller’s photographs.  I am not really a big fan of Surrealism.  A few years ago, when I got to see some of Dali’s best work up close, I could appreciate the beautiful brush work but I didn’t find myself particularly moved.  It was all a bit too clever for me.

Surrealism emerged in the mid-Twenties, a potent, shifting and bubbling period in the art world.  Most of the celebrated artists and thinkers were male (Breton, Dali, Freud, Magritte, Man Ray, Picasso) and these are the names which are inextricably linked with the movement and whose work we have become accustomed to seeing.

Where the curators of this new exhibition have struck gold is by choosing to limit things to a unique viewpoint, namely the part women played as creators.  This helps to make the work relevant, it introduces a much more human aspect and allows the viewer to better understand and feel the emotion pouring out from the artists work on show.

Exhibition spaces can often feel cavernous, cold and intimidating.  Manchester Art Gallery have got things right here though.  Subdued lighting, warm rich colours and intelligent grouping of images make for a meandering and intuitive journey.

The work takes all forms, from painting and photography through to film, sculpture, books and poetry.  Many of the pieces can usually be found ensconced within numerous different private collections, there are 150  images from the 1920’s through to the 1970’s.

After viewing the exhibition I came away with much to think upon.  Many images deal with the representation of women as sexual objects; beautified, empowered, sad, disconnected, shackled.  Sometimes it felt like a celebration, stumbling into someone else’s party, women united and enjoying each others artistry, support and friendship (Lee Miller’s portrait work).  This is women experimenting and questioning, using their art to examine traditional roles and their place within a wider world and trying to find a voice.

leemiller_plate

It is a privilege to have the opportunity to see powerful work such as Lee Miller’s ‘Severed Breast’ (a freshly removed female breast is photographed served up on a dinner plate complete with cutlery on a white linen tablecloth, the was showcased in Vogue the magazine Miller worked for at the time) and Meret Oppenheimer’s wickedly disturbing “Fur Gloves With Wooden Fingernails”.  I really like the work of Manchester-based artist Rachel Goodyear and I believe her images would feel right at home in the slightly gothic and fetish-themed room where Oppenheimer, Penny Slinger and Josette Exandier’s work is displayed. Within this leatherbound haven you will find a fur teacup, a blonde human hair whip (fairytale/Rapunzel?) and bird skeletons.

meretoppenheimer_furgloves

Argentinian painter Leonor Fini’s work stands strong and powerful.  A remarkable women, artist, costume designer and novelist.  I was wowed by her “Little Hermit Sphinx (1948)” with it’s subtle colours and exquisite technique, capturing decay and innocence, a guardian for life and death.

leonorfini_littlehermitsphinx

Batting for the British corner I found Edith Rimmington’s painting “The Oneiroscopist (1947)” haunting, weird and beautiful.

edithrimmington_theoneiroscopist

Photography is well-represented in the exhibition.  I mentioned Lee Miller’s work earlier, but there is an abundance of powerful work.  I discovered the images of Francesca Woodman (Kate Bush a big fan apparently).  This US artist took the photograph chosen for the Exhibition poster and “Untitled” (1977) a self-portrait showing her hanging from a doorway really stayed bouncing round my mind long after I had left the gallery.  Using long exposures she generates a ghostly atmosphere, made all the more powerful when you discover she had a troubled life and committed suicide aged 22yrs.

francesca-woodman_doorway

Dora Maar’s photographic portrait of an armadillo embryo is freakish, spooky and rather innocent, whereas her “Sans Titre” seashell with a hand is classic surrealism, another of her prints hints at her striving towards a more documentary style and one can understand there is a truth to rumours of her appreciation of Walker Evans and Dorothea Lange .  Maar is perhaps better known as Picasso’s muse, but I would love to see more of her photography.

doramaar_pereubu_36

A big star of the show is Frida Kahlo, probably acknowledged as one of the more celebrated female surrealist artists, her work is vibrant and pulses with it’s own distinctive style,  symbolism and themes.  I must make an effort to see the film “Frida” based on her life,  she overcame huge odds to create such powerful paintings.

fridakahlo_diegoyfrida

A new discovery for me was Kay Sage, an American painter working mostly with oils.  She created beautiful, linear landscapes filled with futuristic structures all coloured from a sublime palette.  Sage’s work felt decidedly modern and distinctive, her painting “The Hidden Letter” immediately made me think of Phillippe Starck’s famous iconic lemon squeezer (or am I alone in that thought!).

kaysage_starck

This really is a feast, an exciting opportunity to see such a range of high quality work in one place.  The Gallery has made sterling efforts to enhance the experience, with a programme of talks and tours, games and interactive websites.  All part of a quietly terrific marketing and social media campaign, steered by Wilmslow agency Wonder Associates. Fantastic to see an arts organisation making such an effort to find and engage with their audience.

Further reviews of the exhibition can be found at the Guardian, Independent, Prospect Magazine, creativetourist.com and for a queer slant try Chroma Journal. Angels of Anarchy continues at Manchester Art Gallery until 10th January 2010 and was curated by Dr Patricia Allmer, MIRIAD, Manchester Metropolitan University.

UPDATE: Nov 2010.  Just found a well-written piece in The Telegraph newspaper (England) today on Francesa Woodman.  It’s well worth a read, particularly  if you have an appreciation of Francesca’s work and would like to learn more about her (sadly) rather tragic and short life.  It also highlights the fact that some of Francesca Woodman’s work will be on display at the Victoria Miro gallery in London 17 Nov 2010 – 22 Jan 2011 and also in the New Year 2011 a major retrospective will be on show at San Francisco’s Museum of Modern Art and then on to the Guggenheim in New York in 2012.

Next year, a major Woodman retrospective will travel to San Francisco’s Museum of Modern Art, and on to the Guggenheim in New York in 2012. Before that, though, an exhibition of around 50 of her photographs, including some rare colour prints, opens at the Victoria Miro gallery in London on Wednesday.

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