gill moore photography

Archive for the 'New York Times' Category

“Where can I buy original Art in Manchester and why should I?”

The appetite for owning original works of art has grown steadily over recent years.  Maybe because it is one way to make a house feel individual in these times of flatpack ubiquity.  A well-chosen piece of art can reflect a chink of character of the owner and prompt a smile or moment of pause in the thick of our busy lives.  No bad thing at all and not something that often happens with a Billy Bookcase.

christophbangert

I’ve been asked the question a few times this year “Where can I buy affordable original art?”.  As I am based in Manchester my answer is somewhat limited but here are the options that I know about in my locality:-

  • ArTzu Gallery on Ancoats near the Art Deco Express Building.
  • Artland Gallery under the Quaker Meeting House opposite Central Library, Manchester.  An exciting new venue which ran a stunning exhibition of Jan Chlebik‘s  cityscape photography recently, latest exhibition is by New York Times photographer Christoph Bangert (see image above).
  • Blyths art gallery central Manchester.
  • Castlefield Gallery close to Deansgate Metro Station.
  • Colin Jellicoe Portland Street, Manchester.
  • Comme Ca Art various spots including upstairs at the prestigious Lowry Hotel, Salford/Manchester border.
  • Cornerhouse Projects (downstairs in the bar) close to Oxford Road Station, Manchester.
  • Cube Gallery (architectural related work)  see upcoming exhibiton from award-winning photographer John Davies.
  • Islington Mill, Salford/Manchester border.  Growing artists collective with studios and galleries, often special previews & shows.
  • The Lowry, Salford/Manchester border.  Has occasional exhibitions and work for sale from artists (often local).
  • Manchester Craft and Design Centre Favourite spot for emerging work, textiles, painting, photography …. all sorts.
  • Mooch Art new venture in Northern Quarter plus online gallery selling mostly local artists; painting and photography.
  • Revolve Gallery used to be Manchester-based, moved in Sept 2010 to an impressive space in Clitheroe (just north of Preston in the Ribble Valley).
  • Richard Goodall Gallery Northern Quarter, mostly illustration and photography linked with music promotion and posters, had Leonard Cohen’s work on show last year.
  • Waterside Arts Centre (Sale) nice Gallery space featuring local artists all media from painting, photography through to mixed meda and between.
  • Wendy Levy Gallery very respected Gallery based in West Didsbury top notch artists represented here including Liam Spencer.

daniel_danger

Finally, just in case you find galleries a little intimidating, then you might want to check out a new event on the calender, it’s the Buy Art Fair 24-27 Sept 2009 which enjoyed a very special inaugural launch last year with 3,200 visitors and over 200 artists on display, well staged at the nice, light and airy Urbis, Manchester.  Never spend more than the price of a new sofa, prove your skill at spotting new talent, support creativity and art, make your home original and breathtaking and you never know you might make some money on it too!

UPDATE : For an alternative take, check out a great blog run by a New York Gallery owner Ed Winkleman.  His blog is a really useful place to pick up terrific candid advice on the art world, the nitty gritty of running a Fine Art gallery and to see how sales are going on the other side of the pond.

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Cultural Snapshot; Obama, Grammy’s and Berlin ….

It has been a visually interesting week.  I have browsed through the Obama official photograph taken by Pete Souza (the first taken using a digital camera -a Canon 5D) and the portrait project on his support staff in the New York Times (which for the record I really liked whilst many didn’t, but there you go) taken by Nadav Kander.  But for me two great bits of work really stood out these past 7 days:
thomyorke

100m_of_existence_jan09

  • 2) An interesting photography project by Simon Hoegsburg called rather bleakly “We Are All Gonna Die – 100 meters of existence”.  This is a huge 100m wide photo he has created by combining hundreds of images taken of Berliners (is that a word/not sure!) on the same spot on a bridge over a period of 20 days in 2007.  It documents, it fascinates and tells lots of stories.  On first viewing I scribbled:

[check out the bikes YEP]
[check out the two people with eye patches …. weird !]
[trendy berlin.  great snapshot of city dwellers, only a few people clocked the photographer]

Hoegsburg is based in Denmark but studied in London and he isn’t just a one trick pony.  Have a look at his website, there is plenty of other strong work.  He even has a series on a cycle trip he took using a heavy Copenhagen city bike which you can hire there for one Danish krone.  He took off for Istanbul and went in search of the goodness in people.  When so much photography (art in general) can be a little po-faced, I found his work open, fresh, focussed and powerful.  One to watch out for.

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Life Stories : Photographer Jill Freedman

 

UPDATE ADDED:  5 March 2012.  Some more links to Jill’s work are listed on John Edwin Mason’s excellent blog, which features an image from her “Mardi Gras” series from 1973.  And also the New York Times does a piece on the guy featured in the “Love Kills” image above when he reunited with Jill 30 years later.  Plus this is a link to a video the New York Times did at the time of JF’s exhibition in 2008.
Recently there was a great little article in the New York Times about Jill Freedman a photographer who took some brilliant black and white shots which captured the raw street-life of New York primarily in the 70’s/early 80’s.  In the article Freedman’s work is compared to the more famous photographers Weegee and Diane Arbus yet it is not just Freedman’s images that leave an impression as her story is a fascinating one, illustrating how a career can rise and fall seemingly without reason.  Born in Pittsburgh, USA she came to New York in 1964 and primarily shot with a Leica M4 getting published in the American Press and Life Magazine.
Now 68 years old, Jill Freedman has lived through a great deal, none the least of which is surviving breast cancer, and she is only now in the right frame of mind to think about taking pictures of New York again “I’d like to find what’s left”.   It took a great deal to persuade her back into a gallery but Higher Pictures felt her work deserved some recognition and so, after years of relative anonymity, her profile is on the rise with a new show “Resurrection City” in a East side Gallery and a book project in the bag.
The article really is worth a read as it paints a human story behind the image creator and there is also a 4 minute interview with the lady herself showing off her life’s work which is stored with pride in labelled shoeboxes and a wooden dresser.

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