gill moore photography

Archive for the 'preview' Category

Streetview: A new exhibition for city lovers and fans of Greater Manchester’s architecture.

Streetview exhibition Jan 25th 2013 - Feb 18th 2013

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A new exhibition of original art for city lovers, map makers and fans of Greater Manchester’s architecture. A series of illustrations and models based on Google’s Streetview, with over 30 works including pieces by New-Yorker contributor Stanley Chow, Mark O’Brien, and Clare Allan, as well as international pieces including Luke McGarry – the youngest ever recipient of the National Cartoonists Society’s Silver T-Square prize.

Preview night is this Friday 25th Jan 2013 from 6pm in the Northern Quarter gallery nq2022 on Dale Street,  M1 1EZ.  Everyone is invited.  There is a Facebook event page for Streetview, where you can see who else is coming.

Somehow, amongst all these really talented artists and their work, you will find on display a Gill Moore original has sneaked in!  It’s my first ever attempt at creating an illustration (New Years Resolutions have much to answer for).  Below is a small slice from my effort.  The view in Manchester I picked to draw was one of my favourites; Castlefield Basin and it is copied from the image displayed of the area on Google Streetview.

Original Illustration by Gill Moore of Castlefield Basin based on a Google Streetview image.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The back room will feature a spin off exhibition bringing together the works of Secret Cities photographer Andrew Brooks and illustrator Michael Morrell.  Both artists have documented the BBC Oxford Road demolition, Brooks through his unique style of photography and Morrell through a series of illustrations that will come together to form a comic/social history newspaper.

Have a browse, then join us into the night as the dancing gets started with DOTS AND LOOPS!

This isn’t going to be an ordinary launch, it’s going to be the first big party of 2013, and it’s Burns night so come down, it is sponsored by Tunnocks so there will be free biscuits, well there will be if they make it down from Scotland through the snow!

250 FREE copies of the lovely event brochure care of Ubiquitous and designed by Sam Swaffield will be available on the night

The exhibition will run until February 18th, but there aint no party like the launch night party…

Streetview is curated by Hayley Flynn.  Hayley runs a superb award-winning blog Skyliner, which aims to discover unusual art and architecture. It is well worth a read:  http://theskyliner.org

 


Shot Up North exhibition reaches Newcastle @ the Biscuit Factory in March …

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I blogged during the light nights of June 2008 about my decision to enter the Shot Up North Awards.  SUN is a showcase designed to reward the best in professional photography north of Birmingham and to increase the profile of Northern Photographers in general.  50 images are chosen to be printed in the SUN catalogue, this wings its way to most of the movers and shakers in the Northern creative fraternity.  The winning work is also printed and framed and exhibited at various venues including Manchester, Liverpool, Leeds, Nottingham, Newcastle, Belfast and Birmingham.  So not a bad little showcase at all.

This was my first time for entering any kind of award, so I tried to canvas opinion from my inner advice circle (you know who you are – and thanks!).  In the end there were 3 or 4 images that seemed to be the most popular, which I then entered via the Shot Up North website.  Each image entered incurs an entry fee, so it isn’t just a case of entering hundreds and hoping one will produce success – unless you have money to burn of course.

After the judging I discovered I was successful with one of my images, which I had taken during the summer, at the Feast Festival in Manchester.  It was chosen for exhibiting, inclusion in the SUN catalogue and is also available to purchase as a limited edition print (framed or unframed) via Comme Ca Art.

I had to supply some blurb to go in the brochure and having to write this proved far more strenuous than taking the shot I can tell you!

“I find our physical world fascinating in all its forms from tiny seeds to panoramic landscapes, even crumbling buildings have a soul which sometimes cries out to be captured.

The image (see below titled “lanterns”) was taken at a recent Festival in Manchester, locals placed the floating lanterns on the Lake and created such a beautiful and powerful scene, I just tried to catch the moment – the merging of the community, nature and mankind in harmony, rebirth or farewell?  It made me think of so many things.”  (Gill Moore).

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The exhibition has now reached what looks like a very nice venue in Newcastle called the Biscuit Factory.  It is Britain’s largest commercial gallery with two floors of space.   Apparently my image has been chosen to go on the front cover of their latest gallery brochure which previews the SUN show, which, if true I shall take as a real compliment.  I will endeavour to get my hands on a copy and post up on the blog.

For now here is my image “lanterns” and the overall winning image (and my favourite too) a stunning shot titled “Alpine Choughs” taken by Robert Pogson.

lanterns

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“Where can I buy original Art in Manchester and why should I?”

The appetite for owning original works of art has grown steadily over recent years.  Maybe because it is one way to make a house feel individual in these times of flatpack ubiquity.  A well-chosen piece of art can reflect a chink of character of the owner and prompt a smile or moment of pause in the thick of our busy lives.  No bad thing at all and not something that often happens with a Billy Bookcase.

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I’ve been asked the question a few times this year “Where can I buy affordable original art?”.  As I am based in Manchester my answer is somewhat limited but here are the options that I know about in my locality:-

  • ArTzu Gallery on Ancoats near the Art Deco Express Building.
  • Artland Gallery under the Quaker Meeting House opposite Central Library, Manchester.  An exciting new venue which ran a stunning exhibition of Jan Chlebik‘s  cityscape photography recently, latest exhibition is by New York Times photographer Christoph Bangert (see image above).
  • Blyths art gallery central Manchester.
  • Castlefield Gallery close to Deansgate Metro Station.
  • Colin Jellicoe Portland Street, Manchester.
  • Comme Ca Art various spots including upstairs at the prestigious Lowry Hotel, Salford/Manchester border.
  • Cornerhouse Projects (downstairs in the bar) close to Oxford Road Station, Manchester.
  • Cube Gallery (architectural related work)  see upcoming exhibiton from award-winning photographer John Davies.
  • Islington Mill, Salford/Manchester border.  Growing artists collective with studios and galleries, often special previews & shows.
  • The Lowry, Salford/Manchester border.  Has occasional exhibitions and work for sale from artists (often local).
  • Manchester Craft and Design Centre Favourite spot for emerging work, textiles, painting, photography …. all sorts.
  • Mooch Art new venture in Northern Quarter plus online gallery selling mostly local artists; painting and photography.
  • Revolve Gallery used to be Manchester-based, moved in Sept 2010 to an impressive space in Clitheroe (just north of Preston in the Ribble Valley).
  • Richard Goodall Gallery Northern Quarter, mostly illustration and photography linked with music promotion and posters, had Leonard Cohen’s work on show last year.
  • Waterside Arts Centre (Sale) nice Gallery space featuring local artists all media from painting, photography through to mixed meda and between.
  • Wendy Levy Gallery very respected Gallery based in West Didsbury top notch artists represented here including Liam Spencer.

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Finally, just in case you find galleries a little intimidating, then you might want to check out a new event on the calender, it’s the Buy Art Fair 24-27 Sept 2009 which enjoyed a very special inaugural launch last year with 3,200 visitors and over 200 artists on display, well staged at the nice, light and airy Urbis, Manchester.  Never spend more than the price of a new sofa, prove your skill at spotting new talent, support creativity and art, make your home original and breathtaking and you never know you might make some money on it too!

UPDATE : For an alternative take, check out a great blog run by a New York Gallery owner Ed Winkleman.  His blog is a really useful place to pick up terrific candid advice on the art world, the nitty gritty of running a Fine Art gallery and to see how sales are going on the other side of the pond.

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Were the “Best of Manchester Awards” any good? … in fact do Awards mean anything?

There seems to be awards being presented everywhere you look nowadays, so many in fact that it is impossible to keep up with everything.

I am all for being judged by your audience, critics and peers but one has to ask the question how impartial is impartial? Nowadays, I have no time for Awards with heavy sponsorship … step forward the Brits which is owned by the BPI (British Phonographic Industry aka the British Record Industry). It claims it’s aim is to be “supporting young people in music and education” aahhmm … surely it is about keeping British Music in the headlines and rewarding those that have mastered playing the game and who sell lots of records. I am not saying all Brit winners are talentless but it is just that, as far as I can see, the BPI are just handing out awards to those already successful.

More meaningful are those Awards which generate word-of-mouth and are trying to give a helping hand to those talented (often innovative) souls who have not yet cracked it. Here you may find artistic types who possess a huge belief, a love for their chosen field crikey some folk who might even be doing it for fun and not money.

The cynical amongst you will shout that all Awards by their very nature are never unbiased, yes, true I agree but I guess I’m just saying that some have their hearts closer to the right place than others and this is often down to the Judges sitting on the panel and whether there is any kind of hidden agenda to the Awards.

A check on the Judges for the 2nd “Best of Manchester Awards” held at Urbis recently were Peter Saville Graphic Designer and all-round Manchester Design Guru, Miranda Sawyer (writer, broadcaster), Luke Bainbridge (Music Journalist, Editor Observer Music Monthly), there was the head of A&R at Universal Music, with nods to respected bods @ Castlefield Gallery (Manchester) and Blueprint Music Studios and Elvis Jesus head honcho covering the fashion angle. So a pretty eclectic, informed and opinionated group. Things are lookin’ good.

300 entries fought to prove their work illustrated the best creative thinking and innovation in Manchester, things were wittled down to a shortlist of nine covering Art, Fashion and Music. There is an exhibition to accompany the Awards on the 4th Floor at Urbis until the 28th of September. From the work on show I had a couple of personal favourites … none of which turned out to be the eventual winner so there we go – what do I know !! Still I’d like the share them with you anyway :-)

I loved the graphics and ethos of the Red Deer Club “a small label with big ideas” and brainchild of nu-folk fan Duncan Sime.

On the 4th of May last year, UHC a socially-conscious Design Studio and Artists Collective who deal in “the finest blend of art, design and action” took to the streets. Helped by volunteers and “As part of a protest campaign against consumerism and climate change, 88 hoardings were covered with cream coloured ‘hoods’ emblazoned with the message, ‘trees breathe ads suck’.” (Manchester Evening News). UHC will always annoy some, but their work often seems to harness talent, invention and maybe a measure of eccentricity. Surely it’s not only me who applauds their aim to “present those traveling to work with a special gift – a few precious moments of peace and beauty in place of the incessant noise of advertising”. Wonderful illustrations too …

Finally I was rooting (pun not intended) for Paul Hartfleet to win in the Art Category with his Pansy Project. “Paul revisits locations where homophobia has been experienced and plants pansies. These self seeding pansies act as a living memorial to this abuse and operate as an antidote to it; some pansies wither whilst others thrive in car park borders and windswept road verges. Each Pansy’s location is named after the abuse received and the project is now worldwide with its very own website www.thepansyproject.com.

I know it appears I am blinkered, as his project heavily features photography and Paul’s current project features benches! but trust me, take a trip over to his own site and blog and see more of his fantastic work and ideas.

The actual winners were :

ART: Naomi Kashiwagi

MUSIC: Richard Cheetham, High Voltage

FASHION: Simon Buckley, Rags to Bitches

One final little footnote, I discovered a fab little Manchester band playing to the crowds at the Awards called Keith, a little bit Doors/Radiohead/Talking Heads all delivered with the customary Manc twang and swagger.

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What makes a great photograph? … “how long is a piece of string?”

This year, for the first time, I am entering the Shot Up North Awards.  These UK awards are for photographers based anywhere from the Midlands northwards including Scotland.  The Awards used to be affiliated to the Association of Photographers (AOP) however SUN is now a stand-alone organisation aimed at celebrating and promoting Northern photographers and their work.

I started to ponder what is the key thing that makes an image a great image.  First port of call was viewing some of the previous winning images from Shot Up North.  Though hugely inspiring, I was struck by the variety and disparate array of images selected for the Top 50 over the years.
Studying the photograph at first-hand is always the ideal and what usually happens is you have a gut reaction upon initial viewing and this surely provides the key to answering the question.
I then took a read of the always excellent blog by J M Colberg “Conscientious” which featured a really in-depth piece: “What Makes a Great Photo?” with many gifted photographers and creative’s discussing their own take on answering that question.  After that I just jotted down lots of random thoughts which I list below.

  • emotional kick “wow” factor/connection/memorable tho it also may not wow it could linger and not go away.
  • tells a story/intrigues/shows a voice
  • captures a moment
  • has a sense of style/atmosphere/beauty
  • makes you think/question/can challenge or inform
  • has a high degree of individuality/fresh perspective
  • compelling blend of colours/form/composition
  • intimate – can open a direct channel viewer/photographer.  It communicates.
  • evocative/memory
  • has depth, image encourages/demands repeat viewing
  • reveals something new of the subject; a person/object/environment
  • has an ability to move and touch the viewer
  • element of mystery
  • powerful … it transports you to another place

Sure, it is a bit like asking “how long is a piece of string” but it is such an interesting question with no right or wrong answer; just more for the mix and people react so differently and that it what is so fascinating.

UPDATE : Newer post featuring my Special Edition image and other winners at Shot Up North plus details of the SUN exhibition can be found here.

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Life Stories : Photographer Jill Freedman

 

UPDATE ADDED:  5 March 2012.  Some more links to Jill’s work are listed on John Edwin Mason’s excellent blog, which features an image from her “Mardi Gras” series from 1973.  And also the New York Times does a piece on the guy featured in the “Love Kills” image above when he reunited with Jill 30 years later.  Plus this is a link to a video the New York Times did at the time of JF’s exhibition in 2008.
Recently there was a great little article in the New York Times about Jill Freedman a photographer who took some brilliant black and white shots which captured the raw street-life of New York primarily in the 70’s/early 80’s.  In the article Freedman’s work is compared to the more famous photographers Weegee and Diane Arbus yet it is not just Freedman’s images that leave an impression as her story is a fascinating one, illustrating how a career can rise and fall seemingly without reason.  Born in Pittsburgh, USA she came to New York in 1964 and primarily shot with a Leica M4 getting published in the American Press and Life Magazine.
Now 68 years old, Jill Freedman has lived through a great deal, none the least of which is surviving breast cancer, and she is only now in the right frame of mind to think about taking pictures of New York again “I’d like to find what’s left”.   It took a great deal to persuade her back into a gallery but Higher Pictures felt her work deserved some recognition and so, after years of relative anonymity, her profile is on the rise with a new show “Resurrection City” in a East side Gallery and a book project in the bag.
The article really is worth a read as it paints a human story behind the image creator and there is also a 4 minute interview with the lady herself showing off her life’s work which is stored with pride in labelled shoeboxes and a wooden dresser.

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