gill moore photography

Tag Archive for 'copyright'

Own-It, London. Free Event on Photographing in Public Places.

Apologies for the direct lift from the website but I wanted to get this online ASAP. There are 60 places still left on a FREE workshop in London, directly relevent to anyone photographing in public spaces …. yep that’ll be most everyone then !

Click here to go straight to the Own-It site where you can book advance tickets.

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Orphan Works : What is it, where can I read about what is going on in the US with this proposed new Bill?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Very simply Orphan Works are creative works which have been produced (including photography, music, articles, cartoons, books, painting the list goes on) but the creator of said creative endeavour (or copyright holder) cannot be found to gain permission to reproduce the work.

At the moment, if this occurs, then the photograph (insert relevant option) just cannot be used but with the new legislation here is what would happen. The hopeful user of the creative work would firstly have to exercise “due diligence” to try and track down the copyright holder. If they cannot be found then the the person wishing to use the work would be able to go ahead but must ensure this useage is logged onto a register. The problem seems to be just what exactly is “due diligence” and is this pushing creatives to have to submit everything they produce onto a register so putting the onus onto the creator to protect.

This is a massively contentious area, many creatives are hugely worried and justifiably confused as there seems to be many arguments and scenario’s. That alone makes me think this is an ill-thought out Bill. I do not claim to understand properly and so I will not try and argue things out but I do urge you all to read more on this subject (as I will) we need to protect our right to own and control what we produce.

Pro-Imaging (a UK-based photographers organisation and discussion list) have an Action Alert on their site at the moment and have sent a lobbyist to meet with Senators and Representatives in Washington to educate them to the dangers of the Orphan Works 2008 legislation. Photo Business News has some interesting discussion on their site and to balance things a little Chase Jarvis’ site has arguments on the other side including a link to the ASMP (American Society of Media Photographers) site; this organisation have come out in favour of the Bill.

 

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Free Intellectual Property Advice for creative businesses in Northern England

Are you based in North or North West of England and work within the creative industries?
Do you want some excellent free advice on Intellectual Property (copyrights, trademarks, patents, and related rights)?
If the answer is YES, you should visit www.own-it.org/north.
Own-It was originally launched online in 2004. Devised by the London Development Agency, it delivers free advice on IP for the creative industries in London. Now they are spreading their wings to create Own-It North and expanding to support creative businesses in the North and North West of England. This is a pilot project, they are testing the water until July 2008.
This is a fantastic opportunity made available due to support from Salford University and the Northern Edge Group of Universities, Skillset NW, and the North West Development Agency.

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Photography rights grabs, erosion of freedom, the fightback begins and blogging helps

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In an effort to hold back the tide of rights-grab photographic competitions and to educate those that unwittingly enter them, Pro-Imaging (a UK-based photographers organisation and discussion list) has recently launched a campaign of naming and shaming.  Anyone can submit to the PI website the name of a competition they feel is unfair and PI in turn will investigate.
They have drawn up a Bill of Rights which lists how they feel a photo-competition should be run.   This will be used as a basis to check the Rules of Entry and Terms and Conditions of various submitted competitions.  Already given a black mark are some household names; Adobe, Nikon, Canon, National Geographic, Panasonic and the UK Government … so it seems no-one is too large to be spared.
The campaign has gained a great deal of support on the web and in print, this week the British Journal of Photography reported a recent success of changed T&C’s as a direct result of the PI campaign.
A campaign such as this can only highlight the power of the internet with websites and blogs being a fantastic method of galvanising far-flung individuals who share a common interest and giving them a sense of community and a powerful voice.  Quite by brilliant coincidence the manchesterphotography blog has a great link to an article in the Times which discusses why we need to hang on to our freedom.
This ties in nicely with another big issue gaining much debate at the moment, that of photographers rights to take images in public places.  Ignited in a big way by the Metropolitan Police’s rather provocative campaign asking the general public to become their eyes and ears.  See the posters below, first is the original and underneath a rather humerous counter created by EPUK , another internet-based organisation whose membership is mostly editorial photographers.  See more on their campaign here and here.
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As if that wasn’t enough for you, check out this link.  Here we have a rather misguided and ill-informed Community Support Officer tackling an innocent street photographer in London recently.  
 

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Iris pattern watermark for images

One thing caught my eye this week regarding the hot topic of preventing unlicensed use of photography images and how to identify the copyright holder. It involves work by John Daugman, the original inventor of Iris Recognition. Here is a link to an interesting way forward being investigated by Canon, possible use of the photographer’s individual Iris pattern, thanks to the PhotographyBay Blog for spotting this one, fascinating.

news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/technology/7251621.stm eye_iris.jpg