gill moore photography

Tag Archive for 'exhibition'

Stephen King: Lewis’s Fifth Floor: A Department Story

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Really enjoyed these images from Liverpool photographer Stephen King, featuring photographs taken in Lewis’s Department Store in Liverpool, one of the UK’s oldest and most iconic department stores a building sadly shut down and hidden since the early 1980s.

What a cracking idea, I wish I’d thought of it!  The still life images work better for me, some terrific compositions.  The project has it’s own website www.lewissfifthfloor.com (though it’s a bit slow to load) and there are quite a few images over on Stephen’s site.

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I remember, as a Wirral girl born and bred, it was a big treat to be taken over to Lewis’s on a Saturday for a shopping expedition.  I particularly remember the broken biscuit department was a highlight.

Dates: 26th February to 30th August 2010, Lewis’s Fifth Floor: A Department Story at Liverpool’s  National Conservation Centre.

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Manchester artist Ben Kelly’s new exhibition “Painting the Blues” @ Manchester City FC Museum …

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Award-winning local artist Ben Kelly had a busy time last week.  Sadly, I couldn’t make his Preview Night due to work commitments, but judging by all the feedback and coverage, things went very well indeed.

His exhibition is called “Painting the Blues” and features new work created over the last 12 months.   The aim was to capture the highs and lows of Manchester City Football Club.  Any City fan knows more than most, the world of football is a hugely unpredictable one, where “emotions change from triumph to despair in the space of ninety minutes”.

Even for a club with Manchester City’s history, the last 12 months have been a rollercoaster, yet Ben was given free rein by City to wander wherever he wanted, with unprecedented access to witness activity behind the scenes  aswell as the regular matchday frenzy.  One has to congratulate the club for creating the opportunity for an artist to try and capture the season on canvas and as a huge City fan this was pretty much a dream assignment for Ben.

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He is certainly an artist on the rise; having won a massive £15,000 in December 2006 in a competition organised by the Lowry and Umbro called “One Love – The Football Art Prize”.  He beat 800 other artists from all over the country to scoop the prize when his painting “The Final Whistle” was chosen by a panel of judges, one of whom was Turner Prize winner Mark Wallinger (in the news this week with his ‘Angel of the South’ White Horse commission).
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Next project on the horizon was an exhibition at the prestigious Cheshire gallery Firob & Peacock in Knutsford.   This work showcased some of Ben’s landscape paintings; each piece took the viewer by the hand on a beautiful foray into the woods.  Featuring forests and icy stillness, this exhibition was full of intense atmospherics, Lowry-esque figures almost lost within impossibly elongated trees.  Delicate tints and the occasional dramatic splash of vividity created wonderfully engaging work.

Grab the chance while you can, and see Ben Kelly’s latest work here in Manchester at the City of Manchester Stadium Museum, open now and ending on the 31st March 2009.  All work is for sale, though I understand quite a few were snapped up at the Preview.

Which leads me on to the subject of my next post …. “Where can I buy original Art in Manchester and why should I?”.   Yes indeedee, coming soon … check back on the blog tomorrow (probably!).

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Were the “Best of Manchester Awards” any good? … in fact do Awards mean anything?

There seems to be awards being presented everywhere you look nowadays, so many in fact that it is impossible to keep up with everything.

I am all for being judged by your audience, critics and peers but one has to ask the question how impartial is impartial? Nowadays, I have no time for Awards with heavy sponsorship … step forward the Brits which is owned by the BPI (British Phonographic Industry aka the British Record Industry). It claims it’s aim is to be “supporting young people in music and education” aahhmm … surely it is about keeping British Music in the headlines and rewarding those that have mastered playing the game and who sell lots of records. I am not saying all Brit winners are talentless but it is just that, as far as I can see, the BPI are just handing out awards to those already successful.

More meaningful are those Awards which generate word-of-mouth and are trying to give a helping hand to those talented (often innovative) souls who have not yet cracked it. Here you may find artistic types who possess a huge belief, a love for their chosen field crikey some folk who might even be doing it for fun and not money.

The cynical amongst you will shout that all Awards by their very nature are never unbiased, yes, true I agree but I guess I’m just saying that some have their hearts closer to the right place than others and this is often down to the Judges sitting on the panel and whether there is any kind of hidden agenda to the Awards.

A check on the Judges for the 2nd “Best of Manchester Awards” held at Urbis recently were Peter Saville Graphic Designer and all-round Manchester Design Guru, Miranda Sawyer (writer, broadcaster), Luke Bainbridge (Music Journalist, Editor Observer Music Monthly), there was the head of A&R at Universal Music, with nods to respected bods @ Castlefield Gallery (Manchester) and Blueprint Music Studios and Elvis Jesus head honcho covering the fashion angle. So a pretty eclectic, informed and opinionated group. Things are lookin’ good.

300 entries fought to prove their work illustrated the best creative thinking and innovation in Manchester, things were wittled down to a shortlist of nine covering Art, Fashion and Music. There is an exhibition to accompany the Awards on the 4th Floor at Urbis until the 28th of September. From the work on show I had a couple of personal favourites … none of which turned out to be the eventual winner so there we go – what do I know !! Still I’d like the share them with you anyway :-)

I loved the graphics and ethos of the Red Deer Club “a small label with big ideas” and brainchild of nu-folk fan Duncan Sime.

On the 4th of May last year, UHC a socially-conscious Design Studio and Artists Collective who deal in “the finest blend of art, design and action” took to the streets. Helped by volunteers and “As part of a protest campaign against consumerism and climate change, 88 hoardings were covered with cream coloured ‘hoods’ emblazoned with the message, ‘trees breathe ads suck’.” (Manchester Evening News). UHC will always annoy some, but their work often seems to harness talent, invention and maybe a measure of eccentricity. Surely it’s not only me who applauds their aim to “present those traveling to work with a special gift – a few precious moments of peace and beauty in place of the incessant noise of advertising”. Wonderful illustrations too …

Finally I was rooting (pun not intended) for Paul Hartfleet to win in the Art Category with his Pansy Project. “Paul revisits locations where homophobia has been experienced and plants pansies. These self seeding pansies act as a living memorial to this abuse and operate as an antidote to it; some pansies wither whilst others thrive in car park borders and windswept road verges. Each Pansy’s location is named after the abuse received and the project is now worldwide with its very own website www.thepansyproject.com.

I know it appears I am blinkered, as his project heavily features photography and Paul’s current project features benches! but trust me, take a trip over to his own site and blog and see more of his fantastic work and ideas.

The actual winners were :

ART: Naomi Kashiwagi

MUSIC: Richard Cheetham, High Voltage

FASHION: Simon Buckley, Rags to Bitches

One final little footnote, I discovered a fab little Manchester band playing to the crowds at the Awards called Keith, a little bit Doors/Radiohead/Talking Heads all delivered with the customary Manc twang and swagger.

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Life Stories : Photographer Jill Freedman

 

UPDATE ADDED:  5 March 2012.  Some more links to Jill’s work are listed on John Edwin Mason’s excellent blog, which features an image from her “Mardi Gras” series from 1973.  And also the New York Times does a piece on the guy featured in the “Love Kills” image above when he reunited with Jill 30 years later.  Plus this is a link to a video the New York Times did at the time of JF’s exhibition in 2008.
Recently there was a great little article in the New York Times about Jill Freedman a photographer who took some brilliant black and white shots which captured the raw street-life of New York primarily in the 70’s/early 80’s.  In the article Freedman’s work is compared to the more famous photographers Weegee and Diane Arbus yet it is not just Freedman’s images that leave an impression as her story is a fascinating one, illustrating how a career can rise and fall seemingly without reason.  Born in Pittsburgh, USA she came to New York in 1964 and primarily shot with a Leica M4 getting published in the American Press and Life Magazine.
Now 68 years old, Jill Freedman has lived through a great deal, none the least of which is surviving breast cancer, and she is only now in the right frame of mind to think about taking pictures of New York again “I’d like to find what’s left”.   It took a great deal to persuade her back into a gallery but Higher Pictures felt her work deserved some recognition and so, after years of relative anonymity, her profile is on the rise with a new show “Resurrection City” in a East side Gallery and a book project in the bag.
The article really is worth a read as it paints a human story behind the image creator and there is also a 4 minute interview with the lady herself showing off her life’s work which is stored with pride in labelled shoeboxes and a wooden dresser.

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“The Chorlton Bench Project” by Gill Moore. Preview Night, Chorlton Arts Festival @ Chorlton Library, Manchester.

Last Friday 16th May saw the launch of the 8th Chorlton Arts Festival.  The programme covers visual arts, dance, music, film and with 18,000 visitors to last years festival it seems to grow more popular, bigger and better each year.  It is all based around a 1 mile square area in the South Manchester suburb of Chorlton, Manchester, UK.
I was lucky enough to be chosen to exhibit my most recent work “The Chorlton Bench Project” and I was delighted to be able to bag my number one venue at Chorlton Library.
Friday was the Preview Night for all the visual artists.  Part of the Festival’s appeal is that venue’s can range from an Art Gallery such as Arison, a plant nursery, barschurches and even a first for the festival someone’s own house becoming an ArtHOUSE.
After weeks of hard work and preparation things went right to the wire for my Exhibition;  I kid you not, I had people queuing at the door.  But bang on 6pm I was ready and my Preview Night was up and running. The most popular bench in Chorlton was named shortly after the start.   Lance Crookes, who features in one of the photographs, very kindly accepted my invitation to make the announcement.  The winner was Mary’s Bench which is fairly close to Jackson’s Boat alongside the River Mersey.  Voted Top Spot due to number of visitors, bench aesthetics, bench user vibe and having a darn lovely view.  Apparently the Chorlton Kingfisher can be seen from this spot.
Three other popular shots on the Preview Night were: “smile” on the Blue Bench, “After The Storm” from the Flower Bench and “butties” on the Triangle Bench.  To see all the images selected for the exhibition together with some further information on the “The Chorlton Bench Project” just click here.
Many thanks to those generous souls who selflessly helped with the exhibition and to everyone who made the effort to come along to show their support.  It would have been a very lonely night indeed without you all, I had a fantastic time and I hope you all enjoyed the evening.  The free wine just lasted til the end thank goodness :-)  I have done a quick little montage from pictures taken on the evening (thanks Mike!).
I had loads of feedback notes in the suggestion box, I am so glad I put that up, I always feel a bit self-conscious writing in a comments book so I thought I would try out the box and see what happened.  There were many lovely positive words which are enormously helpful and encouraging to me.  I have posted a few below (I hope people don’t mind).  The handmade postcards sold well, certainly worth all the effort.
This time I’ve been much more organised on the publicity front.  I had fab support from Helen @ Marketing Doris.  I got a little feature in the South Manchester Reporter, though my cunning plan to ensure any picture of my good self would have to be tiny was thwarted as they upsized the small file I gave them and so not only was the picture of me printed, it was big AND fuzzy. :-(
Whilst putting up the exhibition, I got chatting to lots of people who were interested in the images.  This is just what I had been hoping for, folk were reminiscing on their favourite benches, gently chiding me for ones I had missed out,  stories behind some of them (the flower bench grew from a previous Arts Festial which had a nice symmetry).   I even met my local councillor Val Stevens …. a mine of information on Chorlton plus a few of the people who featured in the shots who came along to say hello; it was lovely to see their reaction to the finished work.
“The Chorlton Bench Project” Exhibition will be on display at the library until the end of May, normal library opening hours.  After that, I would love to take the work somewhere else and possibly produce a book illustrated with stories from the locals and with hand-drawn maps of the area and where you can find each bench.  I  have been contacted by a local school who want to write and perform a drama based on one of the benches (I shall let you know how that develops) and an idea that came up on Preview Night was for a web-based International Bench Project (where people could upload their own bench shots from around the world) which would be amazing.  So watch this space …..
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Deutsche Borse Prize 2008; Esko Mannikko, John Davies, Jacob Holdt, Fazal Sheikh.

For anyone who wants a look at the four shortlisted candidates for the Deutsche Borse Prize 2008 then trundle over here click on the gallery view and there are a selection of thumbnails from each of the finalists’ images plus a short biography. Thanks to lensculture.com for a great bit of work.  The eventual winner, announced on 5 March 2008, was Esko Mannikko from Finland for his retrospective exhibition shown at Millesgarden, Stockhom entitled “Cocktails 1990-2007″.  
Two images from the winning exhibition are below.  
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“I am a photographer of fish, dogs and old men”, Männikkö once said. Bringing to attention stories which carry a universal poignancy, Männikkö shows us a world where animals, objects and people are all portrayed and treated with the same mutual respect and childlike wonder.
The three other nominated artists were: 
John Davies (UK) for his exhibition “The British Landscape” at Bradford National Media Museum.  He uses panoramic black and white photography to document the changing post-industrial landscape of Britain between 1979-2005.
Jacob Holdt (Denmark) for “United States 1970-1975″ a book which documents the lives of people he met whilst hitchhiking across the USA.  
Fazal Sheikh (USA) for the publication “Ladli” which seeks to examine the enduring prejudices against women in contemporary Indian Society.
For further information on the prize click here.  All shortlisted work can be seen until April 5th 2008 at the Photograpers’ Gallery, London.  Click here to go to their home site.